[Nrg-l] NRG: Thurs Dec 8 2005 (with title and abstract)

Vijay Erramilli evijay at cs.bu.edu
Tue Dec 6 13:16:59 EST 2005


Hi All,

The title for Christophe's talk :  "Forwarding in Pocket Switched  
Networks"

Paper: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/TechReports/UCAM-CL-TR-617.html

Where: Grad Lounge
When: 11 am Thursday , Dec 8 2005

The abstract and the speaker bio follows:

Vijay


Title: Forwarding in Pocket Switched Networks

Speaker: Christophe Diot, THOMSON

Abstract: Pocket switched networks (PSNs) make use of human mobility and
local forwarding in order to distribute data. Information can be stored
and passed, taking advantage of the device mobility, or forwarded over a
wireless link when an appropriate contact is met. Such networks fall
into the fields of mobile ad-hoc networking and delay-tolerant
networking.

PSN are totally distributed and cant rely on central services for issues
such as naming, authentication, trustatibility. The direct consequence
is that forwarding in PSN is non trivial. In order to better understand
the challenges associated to PSN design, we have collected human
mobility data using Intel Motes.

We discover that the distribution of inter-contact time follows an
approximate power law over a large time range in all data sets. This
observation is at odds with the exponential decay expected by many
currently used mobility models. We discuss the implications of this
observation on forwarding algorithms in PSN.


Bio: Christophe Diot received Ph.D.  in Computer Science from
INP Grenoble in 1991. From 1993 to 1998, he was a research scientist at
INRIA Sophia Antipolis, working on new Internet architecture and
protocols.
  From 1998 to 2003, he created and led the IP research group at Sprint
Advanced Technology Labs. Between 2003 and 2005, Diot worked for INTEL
research in Cambridge, UK.
He recently joined THOMSON in France to start the Paris Research Lab.
He is active in the measurement community (with work on measuring
wireless networks). However, his major interest is now on understanding
how the Internet is going to survive mobility and wireless technologies.



More information about the Nrg-l mailing list