<div>Reminder: this talk is happening tomorrow (Thursday) morning at 10:30am in the Hariri seminar room.</div><div><br></div><div>Mayank</div><div><br></div><div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div>On Sun, Mar 12, 2017 at 17:57 Ran Canetti &lt;<a href="mailto:canetti@bu.edu">canetti@bu.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
  

    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" class="gmail_msg">
    <p class="gmail_msg"><br class="gmail_msg">
    </p>
    <p class="gmail_msg">BUSec talk this Thursday, March 16, 10:30-12pm, Hariri Seminar
      room (MCS 180):</p>
    <p class="gmail_msg">(Lunch to be served after the talk)<br class="gmail_msg">
    </p>
    <div class="m_-7228392682863718348moz-forward-container gmail_msg">
      <div class="gmail_msg">
        <div class="gmail_msg">
          <div class="gmail_quote gmail_msg">
            <div class="gmail_msg"><br class="gmail_msg">
            </div>
            Mechanizing the Proof of Adaptive, Information-theoretic
            Security of Cryptographic Protocols in the Random Oracle
            Model<br class="gmail_msg">
            <br class="gmail_msg">
            Alley Stoughton, BU<br class="gmail_msg">
            <br class="gmail_msg">
            Abstract:</div>
          <div class="gmail_quote gmail_msg">We report on our research
            on proving the security of multi-party cryptographic
            protocols using the EasyCrypt proof assistant. We work in
            the computational model using the sequence of games
            approach, and define honest-but-curious (semi-honest)
            security using a variation of the real/ideal paradigm in
            which, for each protocol party, an adversary chooses
            protocol inputs in an attempt to distinguish the party&#39;s
            real and ideal games. Our proofs are information-theoretic,
            instead of being based on computational assumptions. We
            employ oracles (e.g., random oracles for hashing) whose
            encapsulated states depend on dynamically-made, random
            choices. By limiting an adversary&#39;s oracle use, one may
            obtain concrete upper bounds on the distances between a
            party&#39;s real and ideal games. Furthermore, our proofs work
            for adaptive adversaries, ones that, when choosing the value
            of a protocol input, may condition this choice on their
            current protocol view and oracle knowledge. We provide an
            analysis in EasyCrypt of a three party private count
            retrieval protocol. Our proof reduces the security of the
            protocol to the unpredictability of the random oracle on
            unqueried inputs. We emphasize the lessons learned from
            completing this proof.<br class="gmail_msg">
            <br class="gmail_msg">
            Joint work with Mayank Varia.</div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>

_______________________________________________<br class="gmail_msg">
Busec mailing list<br class="gmail_msg">
<a href="mailto:Busec@cs.bu.edu" class="gmail_msg" target="_blank">Busec@cs.bu.edu</a><br class="gmail_msg">
<a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" rel="noreferrer" class="gmail_msg" target="_blank">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec</a><br class="gmail_msg">
</blockquote></div></div>