<div dir="ltr">Two courses covering topics in security, cryptography, and privacy will be given at Boston University in the spring semester: Symmetric cryptography: design &amp; practice and Privacy Tools for Data Science. The courses will present very different problems and solutions, and students are encouraged to exploit this opportunity to experience a variety of aspects of the security and privacy space. See details below.<br><div><br></div><div><br>CS591 (Computer Science Topics) Symmetric cryptography: design &amp; practice.<br>Instructor: Mayank Varia.<br>Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:30PM. PSY B53.<br><br>Description: This course will introduce the techniques in the theory, design, and cryptanalysis of symmetric cryptography primitives. We will examine several primitives including stream ciphers, block ciphers, and collision-resistant hash functions; specific ciphers studied in detail include DES, AES, and the SHA family of hash functions. Additionally, we will analyze the mathematical strength of these primitives toward common types of mathematical cryptanalysis. Finally, we will explore provably-secure constructions of symmetric-key encryption schemes and message authentication codes from these building blocks. The course will have a hands-on approach, culminating with a symmetric cipher competition of our own. The most important prerequisite is familiarity with algebra and probability; prior exposure to cryptography is helpful but not required.</div><div><br><br>CS591 (Computer Science Topics) Privacy Tools for Data Science.<br>Instructors: Kobbi Nissim and George Kollios.<br>Monday, 2:30-5:30PM. PSY B43.<br><br>Description: Our world is data driven. Information about us is constantly collected and analyzed for research purposes, to provide us ads and services, to inform policy, etc. These uses of data raise concerns about individual privacy. We will explore data privacy in the context of data analytics landscape, focusing on a collection of available and future technological solutions.<br><br> In particular, we will explore some points of the current technological privacy landscape:<br> - What is data privacy?<br> - Data anonymization techniques and their vulnerabilities.<br> - Differential Privacy.<br> - Basic data science techniques: classification, clustering, and prediction.<br> - Secure computation and data mining<br> - Differential Privacy and data analytics<br> - Advanced topics (time permitting)<br><br>The target audience audience for the course are students interested in performing machine learning tasks on collections of sensitive individual data.  Needed background includes knowledge of algorithms, linear algebra, and probability at the level of undergraduate studies. Prior knowledge in machine learning/privacy/cryptography will be helpful but not necessary. Students will be required to hand in 3-4 homework sets and present a final project.<br></div></div>