<div dir="ltr"><div>This is a busy week! <br><br>Eric Wustrow from University of Michigan will be giving a CS colloquium today (Mon 11am). <br><br></div>On Wednesday at 10am, there will be a short talk by Mayank Varia.<br><div><div><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><br>And on Friday, the fourth installment of Charles River Crypto Day will be at Northeastern University with speakers Chris Fletcher, Daniele Micciancio, Kobbi Nissim, and Leo Reyzin. (More details TBA).<br><br>Sharon<br><br>BUsec Calendar:  <a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/" target="_blank">http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/</a><br>BUsec Mailing list: <a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" target="_blank">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec</a><br><br>The busec seminar gratefully acknowledges the support of BU&#39;s Center for Reliable Information Systems and Cyber Security (RISCS).<br><br>*******<br><br>Title: TBD Security Talk<br>Speaker: Eric Wustrow, University of Michigan<br>Monday April 13, 11-12:15pm<br>Hariri Seminar Room, MCS180<br>111 Cummington St,  Boston 02215<br></div>
</div><div><br></div>
</div>
</div>*****<br>Side Channel Resilient Variants of the Advanced Encryption Standard<br>Speaker: Mayank Varia, BU<br><br>Wednesday April 15, 10am, the Hariri Seminar room<br><br>Abstract:<br>Side channel attacks are the Achilles heel of the Advanced Encryption<br>Standard (AES): they are easier for an attacker to exploit in practice<br>than mathematical cryptanalysis, and they are challenging and<br>expensive for defenders to mitigate. This work describes a low cost<br>method to generate random variants of AES suited to applications that<br>do not require interoperability, such as local information storage.<br>These variants retain the security properties of AES.  The random<br>variation choice adds a new, independent component of the key that<br>improves the resilience of AES against existing power-based side<br>channel attacks on FPGAs and protects the user against improper key<br>generation, storage, and reuse. Moreover, our construction is leakage<br>resilient: the additional security gain degrades gracefully if some<br>information about our random variation choice is revealed to the<br>attacker.<br><br>The talk will be accessible even to people without background in cryptography.<br></div></div></div>