<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div>Today, our new postdoc, Foteini Baldimtsi, will be talking about transferable e-cash.  And the Wed after that, Leo Rezyin will talk about key derivation from noisy sources.  As usual, lunch is after the seminar, and abstracts are below.</div><div><br></div><div><div>Hope you can make it!</div><div>Sharon</div><div><br></div><div><span><font style="background-color:rgb(255,255,204)">BUsec</font></span> <span><font style="background-color:rgb(255,255,204)">Calendar</font></span>:  <a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/" target="_blank">http://www.bu.edu/cs/<span><font style="background-color:rgb(255,255,204)" color="#222222">busec</font></span>/</a><div><span><font style="background-color:rgb(255,255,204)">BUsec</font></span> Mailing list: <a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" target="_blank">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/<span><font style="background-color:rgb(255,255,204)" color="#222222">busec</font></span></a></div><div><br></div><div><div>The busec seminar gratefully acknowledges the support of BU&#39;s Center for Reliable Information Systems and Cyber Security (RISCS). <br></div></div><div><br></div><div>******</div><div><br></div><div>Truly Anonymous Transferable E-Cash</div><div>Speaker: Foteini Baldimtsi. BU</div><div>Wednesday Sept 17, 2014  10-11am</div><div>Hariri Seminar Room, MCS180</div><div><br></div><div>Abstract:  Cryptographic e-cash allows off-line electronic transactions between a bank, users and merchants in a secure and anonymous fashion. A plethora of e-cash constructions has been proposed in the literature; however, these traditional e-cash schemes only allow coins to be transferred once between users and merchants. Ideally, we would like users to be able to transfer coins between each other multiple times before deposit, as happens with physical cash. “Transferable” e-cash schemes are the solution to this problem. Unfortunately, the currently proposed schemes are either not efficient at all, or do not achieve the desirable anonymity properties without compromises, such as the existence of a judge, responsible for persecuting double spenders, who can trace all coins and users in the system. This paper presents the first efficient and fully anonymous transferable e-cash scheme without a judge. We start by revising the security and anonymity properties of transferable e-cash to capture issues that were previously ignored. For our construction we use the recently proposed malleable signatures by Chase et al. to allow secure and anonymous transferring of the coins. Finally, we propose an independent, efficient double spending detection mechanism and discuss possible real world applications of our construction.</div><div><br></div><div>Joint work with: Melissa Chase, Georg Fuchsbauer, Markulf Kohlweiss </div><div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div><div><br></div><div>******</div><br><div>Title: Key Derivation From Noisy Sources With More Errors Than Entropy</div><div>Speaker: Leonid Reyzin, BU</div><div>Wednesday September 24, 10-11:30 am</div><div>Hariri Seminar Room, MCS180</div><div><br></div><div>Fuzzy extractors convert a noisy source of entropy (such as a visual password, a biometric reading, or a physically unclonable function) into a consistent uniformly distributed key. In the process of eliminating noise, they lose some of the entropy of the original source. Specifically, to tolerate t errors, most natural constructions lose at least as much entropy as the logarithm of the volume of the ball of radius t. This loss is too high for many practically important sources, which do not have sufficient starting entropy to tolerate it.<br></div><div><br></div><div>We construct the first fuzzy extractors that work for a large class of sources whose starting entropy is not high enough to tolerate such a loss. Our constructions correct Hamming errors over a large alphabet and (necessarily) impose certain restrictions on the distribution of the source. Their security is computational; unlike information-theoretic constructions, they are ``reusable&#39;&#39;--i.e., permit multiple independent enrollments of correlated readings.</div><div><br></div><div>We also explore the limits of achievable error-tolerance by fuzzy extractors, showing that customization for a particular distribution can be a powerful tool. </div><div><br></div><div><div>Joint work with Ran Canetti, Benjamin Fuller, Omer Paneth, and Adam Smith</div></div></div></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div></font></span></div></div></div>