<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">Our penultimate seminar will be on Monday, August 11, from noon-1pm in PHO 339.<br>We will have two talks: &nbsp;(abstracts appended)<br><br>1. &nbsp;Ethan Heilman -&nbsp;From the Consent of the Routed: Improving the Transparency of the RPKI.<br>2. &nbsp;Liangxiao Xin -&nbsp;Gaining Insight on Friendly Jamming in a Real-World IEEE 802.11 Network<div><br>The entire schedule, and some slides, is available at&nbsp;<a href="http://algorithmics.bu.edu/sos">http://algorithmics.bu.edu/sos</a>.<br>---<br>Talk 1<br><br>Title:&nbsp;From the Consent of the Routed: Improving the Transparency of the RPKI.</div><div><br>Speaker/Bio:</div><div>Ethan is a PhD student in the Boston University Security Group (BUSec) of the Computer&nbsp;Science Dept. His research interests are: Network security, crypto currencies, hash function&nbsp;cryptanalysis and side channel attacks. His most recent projects have been related to internet&nbsp;routing and Bitcoin.<br><br></div><div>Abstract:<br>The Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) is a new infrastructure that prevents some of the&nbsp;most devastating attacks on interdomain routing. However, the security benefits provided by the&nbsp;RPKI are accomplished via an architecture that empowers centralized authorities to unilaterally&nbsp;revoke any IP prefixes under their control. We propose mechanisms to improve the transparency&nbsp;of the RPKI, in order to mitigate the risk that it will be used for IP address takedowns. First, we&nbsp;present tools that detect and visualize changes to the RPKI that can potentially take down an IP&nbsp;prefix. We use our tools to identify errors and revocations in the production RPKI. Next, we&nbsp;propose modifications to the RPKI’s architecture to (1) require any revocation of IP address space&nbsp;to receive consent from all impacted parties, and (2) detect when misbehaving authorities fail to&nbsp;obtain consent. We present a security analysis of our architecture, and estimate its overhead&nbsp;using data-driven analysis.<br><br><div>---</div><div>Talk 2<br><br>Title:&nbsp;Gaining Insight on Friendly Jamming in a Real-World IEEE 802.11 Network<br><br></div><div>Speaker/Bio:<br>Liangxiao Xin is a PhD student from Systems Engineering, Boston University. His research&nbsp;interests are wireless communication and cyber security.<br><br></div><div>Abstract:<br>I will present the paper "Gaining Insight on Friendly Jamming in a Real-World IEEE 802.11&nbsp;Network", (Berger, Daniel S., et al. 2014). This paper focus on the practical viability of friendly&nbsp;jamming in a real-world network. They implement a reactive and frame-selective jammer and&nbsp;show the crucial factors governing the trade-off between the effectiveness of friendly jamming and&nbsp;its cost.<br><div apple-content-edited="true">
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; border-spacing: 0px;">---&nbsp;<br>Ari Trachtenberg, Boston University&nbsp;<br><a href="http://people.bu.edu/trachten">http://people.bu.edu/trachten</a> <a href="mailto:trachten@bu.edu">mailto:trachten@bu.edu</a>&nbsp;<br><br></span>

</div>
<br></div></div></body></html>