<div dir="ltr">This week we have a talk by Jamie Morgenstern from CMU as part of our privacy year series. &nbsp;The talk will be at the usual time.<div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">


<div><br></div><div>See you there!</div><div><br></div><div>Sharon</div><div><br></div>
<div>&nbsp;BUsec Calendar: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/" target="_blank">http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/</a></div><div>&nbsp;BUsec Mailing list: <a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" target="_blank">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec</a></div>




<div>&nbsp;How to get to BU from MIT: The CT2 bus or MIT&#39;s &quot;Boston Daytime Shuttle&quot; <a href="http://web.mit.edu/facilities/transportation/shuttles/daytime_boston.html" target="_blank">http://web.mit.edu/facilities/transportation/shuttles/daytime_boston.html</a></div>




<div><br></div><div>****</div><div>Privacy-Preserving Public Information for Sequential Games<br></div><div>Jamie Morgenstern, CMU</div>


<div>Wed, April 9, 10am &ndash; 11:30am</div><div>MCS137</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp;In settings with incomplete information, players can find it</div><div>&nbsp; difficult to coordinate to find states with good social welfare. For</div>




<div>&nbsp; example, in financial settings, if a collection of financial firms</div><div>&nbsp; have limited information about each other&#39;s strategies, some large</div><div>&nbsp; number of them may choose the same high-risk investment in hopes of</div>




<div>&nbsp; high returns. While this might be acceptable in some cases, the</div><div>&nbsp; economy can be hurt badly if many firms make investments in the same</div><div>&nbsp; risky market segment and it fails. One reason why many firms might</div>




<div>&nbsp; end up choosing the same segment is that they do not have</div><div>&nbsp; information about other firms&#39; investments (imperfect information</div><div>&nbsp; may lead to `bad&#39; game states). Directly reporting all players&#39;</div>




<div>&nbsp; investments, however, raises confidentiality concerns for both</div><div>&nbsp; individuals and institutions.</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp; In this paper, we explore whether information about the game-state</div><div>&nbsp; can be publicly announced in a manner that maintains the privacy of</div>




<div>&nbsp; the actions of the players, and still suffices to deter players from reaching bad game-states. We show that in many games of interest, it is possible for players to avoid these bad states with the help of \emph{privacy-preserving, publicly-announced information}. We model behavior of players in this imperfect information setting in two ways -- greedy and undominated strategic behaviours, and we prove guarantees on social welfare that certain kinds of privacy-preserving information can help attain. Furthermore, we design a counter with improved privacy &nbsp;guarantees under continual observation.</div>




<div><br></div><div>Joint work with Avrim Blum, Adam Smith, and Ankit Sharma</div></div></div></div>
</div></div>