<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_quote">
  

    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <b>Reminder: Happening Tomorrow!</b><br>
    <br>
    You are cordially invited to the Charles River Privacy Day, which
    will
    <br>
    take place this on Friday November 15, in the Hariri Institute at
    Boston
    <br>
    University (111 Cummington Mall, MCS 180). There will be four talks
    <br>
    covering different aspects of the challenge of protecting privacy of
    <br>
    personal information in public databases.
    <br>
    <br>
    Also, an introductory talk on data privacy will be given on
    Wednesday,
    <br>
    November 13th at 3pm at the same location (Hariri Institute), by
    <br>
    Professor Adam Smith of Penn State.
    <br>
    <br>
    <a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/charles-river-privacy-day/" target="_blank">http://www.bu.edu/cs/charles-river-privacy-day/</a>
    <br>
    <br>
    No registration is required; attendees may show up at the Hariri
    <br>
    Institute on the days of the events. Abstracts and schedules below.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    The Charles River Privacy Day is co-organized by Ran Canetti, Sharon
    <br>
    Goldberg, Kobi Nissim, Sofya Rashkhodnikova, Leo Reyzin, and Adam
    Smith,
    <br>
    and is sponsored by the Center for Reliable Information Systems and
    <br>
    Cyber Security and by the Hariri Institute for Computing at Boston
    <br>
    University.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Program
    <br>
    ========
    <br>
    <br>
    9 – 9:30am Light breakfast
    <br>
    9:15am Welcome and Introductory Remarks
    <br>
    9:30am Privately Solving Allocation Problems: Aaron Roth (University
    of
    <br>
    Pennsylvania)
    <br>
    10:45am Break
    <br>
    11:00am Fingerprinting Codes, Traitor-Tracing Schemes, and the Price
    of
    <br>
    Differential Privacy: Jonathan Ullman (Harvard University)
    <br>
    12:00pm Lunch (provided)
    <br>
    2:00pm Genome Hacking: Yaniv Erlich (MIT and Whitehead Institute)
    <br>
    3:15pm Break
    <br>
    3:30pm Privacy and coordination: Computing on databases with
    endogenous
    <br>
    participation: Katrina Ligett (California Institute of Technology)
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    The two closest hotels to the Hariri Institute are the Hotel
    <br>
    Commonwealth, 617-933-5000, and the Hotel Buckminster, 800-727-2825.
    The
    <br>
    Hotel Commonwealth offers a BU rate; just mention that you are
    attending
    <br>
    an event at BU.
    <br>
    <br>
    ****
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Abstracts:
    <br>
    <br>
    Pinning Down &quot;Privacy&quot; in Statistical Databases: Adam Smith, Penn
    State
    <br>
        3:00-4:30 pm on Wednesday, November 13, 2013
    <br>
        Hariri Institute, MCS180, 111 Cummington St, Boston, MA
    <br>
    <br>
    Abstract: Consider an agency holding a large database of sensitive
    <br>
    personal information -- medical records, census survey answers, web
    <br>
    search records, or genetic data, for example. The agency would like
    to
    <br>
    discover and publicly release global characteristics of the data
    (say,
    <br>
    to inform policy and business decisions) while protecting the
    privacy of
    <br>
    individuals&#39; records. This problem is known variously as
    &quot;statistical
    <br>
    disclosure control&quot;, &quot;privacy-preserving data mining&quot; or &quot;private
    data
    <br>
    analysis&quot;. We will begin by discussing what makes this problem
    <br>
    difficult, and exhibit some of the problems that plague simple
    attempts
    <br>
    at anonymization. Motivated by this, we will discuss &quot;differential
    <br>
    privacy&quot;, a rigorous definition of privacy in statistical databases
    that
    <br>
    has received significant recent attention. Finally, we survey some
    basic
    <br>
    techniques for designing differentially private algorithms. This
    <br>
    introductory talk complements a day of talks on data privacy
    research to
    <br>
    be held at BU on Friday, November 15:
    <br>
    <a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/charles-river-privacy-day/" target="_blank">http://www.bu.edu/cs/charles-river-privacy-day/</a>
    <br>
    <br>
    Bio: Adam Smith is an associate professor in the Department of
    Computer
    <br>
    Science and Engineering at Penn State, currently on sabbatical at
    Boston
    <br>
    University. His research interests lie in cryptography, privacy and
    <br>
    their connections to information theory, quantum computing and
    <br>
    statistics. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 2004 and was
    subsequently
    <br>
    a visiting scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science and UCLA. In
    <br>
    2009, he received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists
    and
    <br>
    Engineers (PECASE).
    <br>
    <br>
    *****
    <br>
    <br>
    Privately Solving Allocation Problems
    <br>
    Aaron Roth, University of Pennsylvania
    <br>
    <br>
    Abstract: In this talk, we’ll consider the problem of privately
    solving
    <br>
    the classical allocation problem: informally, how to allocate items
    so
    <br>
    that most people get what they want. Here, the data that we want to
    keep
    <br>
    private is the valuation function of each person, which specifies
    how
    <br>
    much they like each bundle of goods. This problem hasn’t been
    studied
    <br>
    before, and for good reason: its plainly impossible to solve under
    the
    <br>
    constraint of differential privacy. The difficulty is that
    publishing
    <br>
    what each person i receives in a high-welfare allocation might
    <br>
    necessarily have to reveal a lot about the preferences of person i,
    <br>
    which is what we are trying to keep private! What we show is that
    under
    <br>
    a mild relaxation of differential privacy (in which we require that
    no
    <br>
    adversary who learns the allocation of all people j != i — but
    crucially
    <br>
    not the allocation of person i — should be able to learn much about
    the
    <br>
    valuation function of player i) the allocation problem is solvable
    to
    <br>
    high accuracy, in some generality. Our solution makes crucial use of
    <br>
    Walrasian equilibrium prices, which we use as a low information way
    to
    <br>
    privately coordinate a high welfare allocation.
    <br>
    <br>
    Bio: Aaron Roth is the Raj and Neera Singh assistant professor of
    <br>
    Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.
    <br>
    Prior to this, he was a postdoctoral researcher at Microsoft
    Research,
    <br>
    New England, and earned his PhD at Carnegie Mellon University. He is
    the
    <br>
    recipient of a Yahoo! Academic Career Enhancement Award, and an NSF
    <br>
    CAREER award. His research focuses on the algorithmic foundations of
    <br>
    data privacy, game theory and mechanism design, and the intersection
    of
    <br>
    the two topics.
    <br>
    <br>
    ***
    <br>
    <br>
    Genome Hacking
    <br>
    Yaniv Erlich, MIT and Whitehead Institute
    <br>
    <br>
    Abstract: Sharing sequencing datasets without identifiers has become
    a
    <br>
    common practice in genomics. We developed a novel technique that
    uses
    <br>
    entirely free, publicly accessible Internet resources to fully
    identify
    <br>
    individuals in these studies. I will present quantitative analysis
    about
    <br>
    the probability of identifying US individuals by this technique. In
    <br>
    addition, I will demonstrate the power of our approach by tracing
    back
    <br>
    the identities of multiple whole genome datasets in public
    sequencing
    <br>
    repositories.
    <br>
    <br>
    Short bio: Yaniv Erlich is a Fellow at the Whitehead Institute for
    <br>
    Biomedical Research. Erlich received his Ph.D. from Cold Spring
    Harbor
    <br>
    Laboratory in 2010 and B.Sc. from Tel-Aviv University in 2006. Prior
    to
    <br>
    that, Erlich worked in computer security and was responsible for
    <br>
    conducting penetration tests on financial institutes and commercial
    <br>
    companies. Dr. Erlich’s research involves developing new algorithms
    for
    <br>
    computational human genetics.
    <br>
    <br>
    *****
    <br>
    <br>
    Privacy and coordination: Computing on databases with endogenous
    <br>
    participation
    <br>
    Katrina Ligett, Assistant Prof of Computer Science and Economics,
    Caltech
    <br>
    <br>
    Abstract: We propose a simple model where individuals in a
    <br>
    privacy-sensitive population decide whether or not to participate in
    a
    <br>
    pre-announced noisy computation by an analyst, so that the database
    <br>
    itself is endogenously determined by individuals’ participation
    choices.
    <br>
    The privacy an agent receives depends both on the announced noise
    level,
    <br>
    as well as how many agents choose to participate in the database.
    Each
    <br>
    agent has some minimum privacy requirement, and decides whether or
    not
    <br>
    to participate based on how her privacy requirement compares against
    her
    <br>
    expectation of the privacy she will receive if she participates in
    the
    <br>
    computation. This gives rise to a game amongst the agents, where
    each
    <br>
    individual’s privacy if she participates, and therefore her
    <br>
    participation choice, depends on the choices of the rest of the
    population.
    <br>
    <br>
    We investigate symmetric Bayes-Nash equilibria, which in this game
    <br>
    consist of threshold strategies, where all agents whose privacy
    <br>
    requirements are weaker than a certain threshold participate and the
    <br>
    remaining agents do not. We characterize these equilibria, which
    depend
    <br>
    both on the noise announced by the analyst and the population size;
    <br>
    present results on existence, uniqueness, and multiplicity; and
    <br>
    discuss a number of surprising properties they display.
    <br>
    <br>
    Joint work with Arpita Ghosh
    <br>
    <br>
    Brief bio: Katrina Ligett is an assistant professor of computer
    science
    <br>
    and economics at Caltech. Before joining Caltech in 2011, she
    received
    <br>
    her PhD from Carnegie Mellon and spent two years as a postdoc at
    Cornell.
    <br><br></div></div>-- <br>Sharon Goldberg<br>Computer Science, Boston University<br><a href="http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe" target="_blank">http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe</a>
</div>