<div dir="ltr"><div>All,<br></div><div>Welcome back to a new semester!  Our regular BUsec seminar will be at Wednesday 10AM this year, and our first seminar will start this week.  Melissa Chase from MSR will be telling us about controlled malleability.  As usual, lunch will be served, and we will meet in MCS137.</div>


<div> </div><div>Also, we are now working on setting the schedule for the semester; please email me if you have new work you would like to present.</div><div> </div><div>See you all then!</div><div> Sharon<br><br>  <span>BUsec</span> Calendar:  <a href="http://www.bu.edu/cs/busec/" target="_blank"><font color="#0066cc">http://www.bu.edu/cs/<span>busec</span>/</font></a><br>


  <span>BUsec</span> Mailing list:  <a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" target="_blank"><font color="#0066cc">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/</font><font color="#0066cc">mailman/listinfo/<span>busec</span></font></a><br>


  How to get to BU from MIT:  Try the CT2 bus or MIT&#39;s &quot;Boston Daytime<br>  Shuttle&quot; <a href="http://web.mit.edu/facilities/transportation/shuttles/daytime_boston.html" target="_blank"><font color="#0066cc">http://web.mit.edu/facilities/</font><font color="#0066cc">transportation/shuttles/</font><font color="#0066cc">daytime_boston.html</font></a><br>


<br> *****<br>Controlled Malleability<br>Melissa Chase, MSR (Redmond)</div><div>Wednesday, Sept 11, 2013 10AM<br> MCS137, 111 Cummington St, Boston, MA<br><br> Abstract:</div><div><div class="gmail_quote"><div lang="EN-US" vlink="purple" link="blue">


<div><p>Depending on the application, malleability in cryptography can be viewed as either a flaw or –as in the case of homomorphic primitives—as a feature.  In most previous settings, malleability has been an all-or-nothing property: either all malleability is prevented, or we can make no guarantees whatsoever on how the adversary may transform what he is given.  However, in many cases one would like to allow some malleability while guaranteeing that that is all that an adversary can do; we call this controlled malleability.  We will consider this concept in terms of proof systems, encryption schemes, and signatures, looking at how to formally define these primitives and how they relate to previous notions.  We will briefly discuss how to construct these objects, concretely based on DLIN in the pairing setting, or more generically based on any publically verifiable SNARG.  Finally, we will discuss a few applications, focusing on a new approach to verifiable shuffles.<br clear="all">


<br>-- <br>Sharon Goldberg<br>Computer Science, Boston University<br><a href="http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe" target="_blank">http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe</a>
</p></div></div></div></div></div>