<div class="gmail_quote">---------- Forwarded message ----------<br>From: &quot;Tristen M. Dixey&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:tristen@eecs.harvard.edu">tristen@eecs.harvard.edu</a>&gt;<br>Date: Feb 22, 2013 2:50 PM<br>Subject: Computer Science Colloquium - MONDAY, February 25, 4:00pm, MD G125: Zvika Brakerski, Stanford University<br>
To: &quot;Tristen M. Dixey&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:tristen@eecs.harvard.edu">tristen@eecs.harvard.edu</a>&gt;<br>Cc: <br><br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Please join us Monday afternoon at 4:00pm in MD G125 for a special Computer Science Colloquium. Zvika Brakerski of Stanford University will present a talk entitled &quot; Fully Homomorphic Encryption&quot;.<br>
<br>
Monday, February 25, 2013<br>
4:00pm (Refreshments at 3:30 in the MD Lobby)<br>
Maxwell Dworkin G125<br>
<br>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------<br>
<br>
Title: Fully Homomorphic Encryption<br>
<br>
The problem of constructing fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) is one of the oldest and most fascinating in cryptography. An FHE scheme allows one to perform arbitrary computations f on encrypted data Enc(x), so as to obtain the encryption Enc( f(x) ), using only public information and without learning anything about the value of x. This enables outsourcing computations on private data to a third party, while maintaining the data&#39;s privacy (for example &quot;oblivious web search&quot;) - a core task for secure cloud computing.<br>

<br>
The first candidate FHE scheme was introduced in 2009 (over 30 years after the problem was proposed), in Gentry&#39;s breakthrough work. This scheme, however, was not without drawbacks: it was a complicated patchwork of a number of components, each relying on a different hardness assumption, and it included labor-intensive procedures that made it hard to implement.<br>

<br>
We introduce a new generation of FHE schemes, which is based on a standard cryptographic assumption. Our new schemes enjoy improved security, greater efficiency and simple presentation, and are the basis for modern implementations. In my talk I will explain the notion of FHE, present a &quot;new generation&quot; scheme, and discuss future directions.<br>

<br>
Speaker Biography:<br>
Zvika Brakerski received his PhD from the Weizmann Institute of Science in 2011, and is currently a Simons Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. Zvika&#39;s research focuses on theory of cryptography, and in particular on models and solutions for security threats in the cloud computing era. He made contributions to the study of leakage resilient cryptography and circular secure encryption and, most notably, several significant contributions to the development of fully homomorphic encryption. The new approaches laid out in his fully homomorphic encryption works now underlay all modern implementations of fully homomorphic encryption schemes. Outside the field of cryptography, he recently made a significant contribution to the study of interactive coding, showing the first computationally efficient interactive coding scheme.<br>

<br>
More Information: <a href="http://www.stanford.edu/~zvika/" target="_blank">http://www.stanford.edu/~zvika/</a><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Theory-seminars mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Theory-seminars@eecs.harvard.edu">Theory-seminars@eecs.harvard.edu</a><br>
Subscribe/unsubscribe/customize at <a href="https://lists.eecs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/theory-seminars" target="_blank">https://lists.eecs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/theory-seminars</a><br>
</blockquote></div>