<br><div class="gmail_quote"><br>--------------------<br>
New reading group: Entanglement and Cryptography.<br>
<br>
Summary<br>
-------------<br>
<br>
When: Wednesdays 4-6pm. First class February 6th.<br>
Where: G531<br>
What: Revolutionizing multiparty cryptography by harnessing basic<br>
quantum mechanics and special relativity<br>
Who: Interested graduate and advanced undergraduate students willing<br>
to put in a reasonable amount of reading and creative thinking effort.<br>
Instructor: Thomas Vidick (<a href="mailto:thomas.vidick@gmail.com">thomas.vidick@gmail.com</a>)<br>
<br>
Details<br>
----------<br>
<br>
A number of very recent breakthroughs have demonstrated an expanding<br>
range of possibilities for the use of quantum mechanics in<br>
cryptography:<br>
<br>
- Classical testing of a quantum computer (or, how to puppeteer a<br>
quantum computation with classical hands):<br>
<a href="http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/1209.0448" target="_blank">http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/1209.0448</a>. This will likely be the first paper<br>
we read (and maybe the one we spend most time on): get started early!<br>
- Device-independent key distribution  (or, how to obtain secure<br>
implementation of two-party cryptography without any computational<br>
assumption): <a href="http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1209.0435" target="_blank">http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1209.0435</a>,<br>
<a href="http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1210.1810" target="_blank">http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1210.1810</a><br>
- Randomness certification (or, how to guarantee the house&#39;s shuffle):<br>
<a href="http://arxiv.org/abs/0911.3427" target="_blank">http://arxiv.org/abs/0911.3427</a><br>
<br>
What is even more surprising is that security of protocols for these<br>
tasks can be guaranteed *without even relying on quantum mechanics*.<br>
Only some kind of causal isolation is required between the parties.<br>
<br>
The goals of the reading group will be, starting from the study of<br>
some of the papers linked to above (and others), to:<br>
1) Understand the properties of quantum mechanics that make such tasks<br>
possible. These include entanglement, no-signaling correlations and<br>
the phenomenon of monogamy.<br>
2) Find ideas for cryptographic tasks that can be solved by taking<br>
advantage of these properties. Initial suggestions include delegated<br>
computation, distributed computation, or other multiparty primitives,<br>
but I expect that we will find much more as we go along.<br>
<br>
The format: we will meet for two hours every Wednesday at 4pm. Each<br>
week one of the participants will present a paper, and we will discuss<br>
it. If there is interest a more focused group might form around<br>
pursuing research around some of the ideas that were presented, and<br>
will report to the reading group. We will try to have guest lectures<br>
by experts whenever available.<br>
<br>
Workload: this is an advanced reading group and will require a minimal<br>
amount of involvement (reading papers, coming up with questions,<br>
etc.). Most of the ideas discussed however will not require too much<br>
background, and anyone interested should be able to pick up the<br>
required facts on quantum computing and/or cryptography on the go.<br>
<br>
The reading group has a webpage where you will find an updated<br>
schedule and also notes for the lectures:<br>
<a href="http://people.csail.mit.edu/vidick/dicrypto_spring13.html" target="_blank">people.csail.mit.edu/vidick/dicrypto_spring13.html</a><br>
There is also a mailing list for announcements, and anyone interested<br>
should sign up here:<br>
<a href="https://lists.csail.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/dicrypto-reading" target="_blank">https://lists.csail.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/dicrypto-reading</a><br>
<br></div>