<div class="gmail_quote">All,<br>
<br>
Tomorrow, Alessandro Chiesa from MIT will tell us how proof-carrying data makes delegation more affordable (Monday Oct 15 at 
10AM.)  On Thursday next week, CS is hosting a talk with the 
International Relations department that some may be interested in.<br>
<br>
Our next seminar will be two weeks later, on Monday Oct 29, where<br>
Allison Lewko from MSR will be talking about attribute-based<br>
encryption.<br>
<br>
As usual, BUsec talks will be in MCS137 at 111 Cummington St, Boston, with<br>
lunch provided; the CS/IR talk will be at Hariri.  Abstracts below.<br>
<br>
Sharon<br>
<br>
BUsec Calendar:  <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/busecuritygroup/calendar" target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/busecuritygroup/calendar</a><br>
BUsec Mailing list:  <a href="http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec" target="_blank">http://cs-mailman.bu.edu/mailman/listinfo/busec</a><br>
<br>
****<br>
<br>
Title: How Proof-Carrying Data Makes Delegation More Affordable<br>
Speaker: Alessandro Chiesa<br>
Monday October 15,  10AM<br>
MCS137<br>
<br>
Abstract:<br>
<br>
Succinct arguments are computationally-sound proof systems that allow<br>
verifying NP statements with lower complexity than required for<br>
classical NP verification<br>
<br>
In this talk, we will discuss two important efficiency aspects of<br>
succinct arguments:<br>
(1) the time and space complexity of the prover<br>
(2) the offline complexity of the verifier (a.k.a. preprocessing complexity)<br>
<br>
We will look at how well (or badly) do existing succinct argument<br>
constructions perform with respect to the above aspects. We will then<br>
discuss how the framework of proof-carrying data can be used to<br>
&quot;bootstrap&quot; non-interactive succinct arguments that suffer from<br>
expensive offline complexity or poor prover complexity (or both) into<br>
SNARKs that no longer suffer from either.<br>
Overall, we achieve a solution that performs very well relative to the<br>
above aspects.<br>
<br>
Joint work with Nir Bitansky, Ran Canetti, and Eran Tromer.<br>
<br>
****<br>
<br>
 “What Increases the Probability of Cyber War?: Bringing International<br>
Relations Theory Back In”<br>
<br>
 Timothy Junio<br>
<br>
Thursday, October 18,  12:15 to 2:00 p.m. (Lunch will be available at 11:45 a.m)<br>
 Venue: Hariri Institute Seminar Room – 111 Cummington Street, Boston University<br>
<br>
Timothy J. Junio (Tim) is a fifth-year doctoral candidate of political<br>
science at the University of Pennsylvania, and during the 2012-2013<br>
academic year will be a predoctoral fellow at the Center for<br>
International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University<br>
(co-funded by the Hoover Institution). He also develops new cyber<br>
capabilities for the US military and intelligence community as a<br>
researcher with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).<br>
<br>
Few IR scholars have sought to explain the conditions under which<br>
states are likely to use coercion in cyberspace, or more generally how<br>
states should be expected to behave in this new security environment.<br>
Those who have tend to emphasize the improbability of cyber war. In<br>
contrast to rationalist causes of war theories that predict an<br>
equilibrium of mutually defensive cyber strategies in the<br>
international system, Junio presents an argument elevating domestic<br>
political factors with the potential to escalate to the offensive use<br>
of cyber power.<br>
<br>
This event is sponsored by the Center for International Relations at<br>
BU and the Computer Science Department at BU.<br>
<br>
Seats are limited so please let us know by Monday, October 15, if you<br>
plan to attend: <a href="mailto:lbpuyat@bu.edu" target="_blank">lbpuyat@bu.edu</a><br>
<br>
***<br>
New Proof Techniques and Remaining Challenges for Attribute-Based Encryption<br>
Speaker:  Allison Lewko<br>
Mon, October 29, 10:00am – 11:30am<br>
MCS 137,<br>
<br>
We will present the state of the art for provably secure<br>
attribute-based encryption schemes and also discuss open directions.<br>
This is joint work with Brent Waters.<br>
<span><font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
Sharon Goldberg<br>
Computer Science, Boston University<br>
<a href="http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe" target="_blank">http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe</a><br>
</font></span></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Sharon Goldberg<br>Computer Science, Boston University<br><a href="http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe" target="_blank">http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe</a><br>