[Busec] Mariana Raykova talk, 11AM on Tuesday in MCS137

Sharon Goldberg goldbe at cs.bu.edu
Fri Feb 3 07:48:08 EST 2012


Hi,

Mariana Raykova will be speaking at group meeting on Tuesday, 11AM, in
MCS137.
As usual, lunch will be provided.

See you next week!
Sharon


Secure Computation in Heterogeneous Environments: How to Bring Multiparty
Computation Closer to Practice?

Mariana Raykova, Columbia University

Abstract:
Secure multiparty computation (MPC) studies the question of how to compute
functions that depend on the private inputs of multiple parties in a secure
way that reveals only the output to the designated receiver while
protecting the inputs and other intermediate state information. While
cryptographic protocols, which demonstrate the feasibility of secure
computation for any function, have been around for more than 30 years, such
protocols still have efficiency overheads that are prohibitive for many
practical applications. They are also not designed to meet the requirements
of many heterogeneous environments where secure computation protocols will
be useful, in which different parties have different resources
(computation, communication, memory), have different incentives for
adversarial behavior, and often operate in highly distributed systems.

In my research I have explored different approaches  to bring secure
computation closer to practice. These include using new computational
models that overcome inherent inefficiencies in existing MPC schemes,
defining new adversarial models that reflect better practical setups,
constructing protocols for outsourced computation and verification as well
as constructing protocols tailored for distributed computation resources.
In this talk I would give an overview of my research work. Then I would
focus on three examples of my projects. I would present a new paradigm for
constructing verifiable computation schemes from attribute-based
encryption. Second, I would talk about how we can achieve secure
computation protocols with sublinear computation complexity in the size of
their inputs (crucial for computation on big databases) and what is our
solution to this question. I would also present a different approach to
secure computation in the setting of encrypted search, where given strict
efficiency requirements we optimize the privacy guarantees achieved and
define relaxed, yet, meaning security notions.

-- 
Sharon Goldberg
Computer Science, Boston University
http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe
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